DECKING SCREW – P/1000

$136.95$356.86 excl. GST

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SKU: DSO12090S304-1 Category:

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Questions about decking screws

What are Decking Screws?

Deck screws are specifically designed to hold down timber or composite deck boards to structural timber or steel beams (joists) and are easily identifiable from standard wood screws.

Decking Screws or Nails

Deck screws are the best, hands down. Nails will rise up and create a hazard and they tend to corrode more quickly. Screws are more expensive but hold better and won’t corrode if you use the correct type.

Does the size of the deck have any significance for the choice of fastener?

Yes and no! If you build the deck correctly from the start, with a stable framework and the recommended spacing, the answer is no. But if you cut corners with this, there may be greater forces in play in a larger timber deck, as the wood moves over longer lengths. If you want extra security in your structure, stainless steel is the better choice.

How does the height of the deck affect the choice of fastener?

You can build a high yet stable deck, but there will be a greater risk of movements if a deck is built high off the ground. If you install a timber deck on high posts, we recommend that you use stainless decking screws due the greater risk of movements.

The same recommendation applies to timber decks where the load-bearing structure rests directly on the ground, in order to minimise the risk of corrosion.

A2, A4, which quality should I choose?

It is important to choose correct quality of the decking screws according to where and how you are building your timber deck. Make sure you always check the recommendations from your timber supplier. Below is a brief recommendation.

Stainless A4

Stainless A4 screw is made of unhardened acid-proof steel with the highest corrosivity class C5. This screw can be used for all wood decking structures, but should definitely be used in aggressive environments, e.g. by pools and jetties, and for timber decks in coastal locations near salt water. Stainless A4 screws are also recommended if you’re building a deck with tropical hardwoods.

Stainless A2

Stainless A2 is made of unhardened steel with corrosivity class C4. We recommend this screw for structures near lakes or brackish water.
We also recommend it for railings, fences and steps for your wood deck, since it provides good resistance to corrosion and movements.

Which distance should I have between decking boards?

Timber is a hygroscopic construction material. It senses the humidity and temperature of the ambient air, and constantly strives to harmonise with the ambient climate. The moisture ratio not only varies between individual pieces of wood in a batch of timber – it also varies in the cross-section of a piece of timber. Timber dries from the outside in. If no special measures are taken, this means that the inner parts of the piece of timber will be considerably moister than its surface after drying at the sawmill.

When the moisture ratio then reaches fibre saturation, at approx. 30% moisture ratio, the moisture in the cell walls begins to leave the timber, and this is one of the reasons the timber begins to shrink. The timber begins to shrink from the outside in. This means that the decking you install will ‘move’ constantly throughout the year and the size of these movements will depend on the amount of water the deck is exposed to. This explains why you need to leave a gap between each decking board.

To sum up: the decking you install will ‘move’ constantly throughout the year and the size of these movements will depend on the amount of water and the temperatures the deck is exposed to. This explains why you need to leave a gap between each decking board.